Ofsted Education Inspection Framework 2019 and the implications for Further Education

The 2019 Education Inspection Framework has now been released by Ofsted and will be in use from September 2019. Some comments on the link below about some of the key messages for FE.

https://feweek.co.uk/2019/05/14/what-ofsteds-new-inspection-framework-means-for-fe/

https://www.fenews.co.uk/fevoices/29455-ofsted-s-new-education-inspection-framework-2019-sector-response

 

Links to the 2019 handbook and the inspection framework below:

https://feweek.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Education_inspection_framework.pdf

https://feweek.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/FES-handbook.pdf

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/education-inspection-framework

Information on inspecting the curriculum and the responses to the Ofsted consultation on the new framework:

https://t.co/F0VgcjU3gs

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CollectivED issue 8 Working Papers – Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners: Some Reflections on the National Conference, March 29th 2019 by Joanne Miles

For anyone who would like to catch up on the exciting ETF programme to develop Advanced Practitioner capacity in the UK, I have contributed article 12 to CollectivED Issue 8 Working Papers. You can read the article and many other interesting pieces through the link below. Many thanks to Prof Rachel Lofthouse for the opportunity to do this.

Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners: Some Reflections on the National Conference, March 29th 2019

 

https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/-/media/files/schools/school-of-education/collectived-issue-8-may-2019-final2.pdf?la=en

 

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Next phase of ETF Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners – Register now!

It was great to hear that the Education and Training Foundation had funded a second phase of the Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners, as the first year has been so fruitful and exciting for those involved. Registration is now open for participation in phase two, with different strands available to suit varying levels of Advanced Practitioner experience and expertise. If you click here, you should be able to download a form with details on the strands and the relevant application forms. Please contact Alison Tanik with any questions you may have or if you have problems downloading the form from my blog. Alison’s email is tanikalison@gmail.com

Here is the link to the June 2019 three-day CPD programme for Advanced Practitioners. There are only a few places left so quick action required on this one!

https://booking.etfoundation.co.uk/course/details/323/Developing-Advanced-Practitioners?sh=165060&ci_id=2272

For details of the work in year one, here are two related blog posts:

https://joannemilesconsulting.wordpress.com/2019/04/05/professional-development-programme-for-advanced-practitioners-some-reflections-on-the-national-conference-march-29th-2019/

https://joannemilesconsulting.wordpress.com/2019/04/08/benefits-of-participation-in-a-national-development-project-reflections-on-the-professional-development-programme-for-advanced-practitioners/

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Upcoming Events for Teachers, Mentors, Coaches and Advanced Practitioners in the FE Sector

The summer term is often a time for conferences and dissemination events so here are a few that I think could be of interest to classroom practitioners, coaches, mentors and Advanced Practitioners in the FE sector. They incorporate some presentation slots but also plenty of time and space to learn from others, share practices, network and reflect on our work.

1.UKFE Chat Conference- June 15th 2019

Wide range of speakers at this event, with a focus on FE, adult and work-based provision. Chances to share, discuss and collaborate.

https://www.tmc.ac.uk/events/ukfechat-conference-2019

 

2. Reimagine FE – July 2nd 2019

I have attended this event several times and found the working group discussions very interesting.

https://reimaginefe.wordpress.com

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/reimaginefe19-conference-tickets-55692855831

 

3.  FE Research Meet – July 3rd 2019

I have spoken at several of these events and also attended sessions and they are a really great way to hear about practitioner-led research in a range of settings.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/feresearchmeet-bedford-2019-tickets-55872740872

Interesting read below about the practitioner-research movement developing in the FE sector.

https://feweek.co.uk/2017/11/13/fe-practitioner-research-movement-gathers-pace/

 

4. CollectivED Knowledge Exchange – July 4th 2019

This will be of interest to coaches, mentors and Advanced Practitioners.

https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/events/school-events/collectived-knowledge-exchange-creating-powerful-professional-learning-in-education/

Some more information here about CollectivED and the CollectivED Working Papers that you may want to read, share or make a contribution to in future.

https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/carnegie-school-of-education/research/collectived/

 

Learning Skills and Research Network  Networking The Networks website is also a useful source of information. It provides links to a range of networks and organisations involved in research and the use of evidence for the FE and Skills sector. It also offers links to resources to support practitioners doing research or using evidence.

http://networkingthenetworks.com

https://lsrn.wordpress.com/news-events/

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Benefits of Participation in a National Development Project: Reflections on the Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners

During 2018-19, this professional development programme has aimed to develop practitioners working in Advanced Practitioner-type roles across the education and training sector. Participants have been able to access five programme strands:

  • Communities of Practice (CoP)
  • Collaborative Projects
  • Developing Advanced Practitioners 3-day CPD programme
  • Advanced Practitioner Toolkit
  • National Advanced Practitioner Conference (March 2019)

More details on these strands on this link:

https://www.et-foundation.co.uk/supporting/support-practitioners/advanced-practitioners/

Having played a small role in the programme, training up the Collaborative Project Leads and some AP Mentors and also working in an advisory capacity, I was fascinated to see what had emerged from the work to date in different settings. I work widely in the sector to set up, train and mentor Advanced Practitioner/coaching teams and welcome this national focus on exploring and reflecting on the role in a coherent and structured way. I think AP/coaching teams have much to gain and learn from each other and that the connections and opportunities to collaborate fostered in this ETF programme can lead to significant development in the role. Since the national conference on March 29th2019, it has been interesting to reflect on what I have heard about the benefits of being part of this national project and what the broader context of the programme has brought to the APs involved in it.

What were the benefits of participating in this national development programme?

The national conference in March 2019 was a chance for APs to share, celebrate and critically reflect on the work in different settings this year and to focus on the key question “What difference has the AP programme made?” Conference attendees could attend workshops for an in-depth look at findings from several organizations and also participate in Action Learning Sets and a Thinking Environment Evaluation. There is also a formal impact analysis and evaluation process in place to provide further insights on the effects of this programme in its different contexts.

In presentations and informal conversations there were many personal insights from a range of Advanced Practitioners about the perceived impact of their involvement in the national development programme. These comments clustered around recurring themes:

  1. The power of collaboration

Some Advanced Practitioners commented that the programme had encouraged them to collaborate within and between the partner organizations in more depth and detail than may have happened without the impetus of the programme. Several mentioned that the collaboration was particularly rich and deep where some prior relationship already existed to build upon, e.g. a TLA Head and a Quality/Development Lead who knew each other before the programme started.

Some Advanced Practitioners reflected on the collaborative elements of the programme (online communities; action learning sets; collaborative projects) and noted how they gained confidence, reassurance and ongoing support from others in a similar role. Advanced Practitioners and coaches are generally a small group of staff within any organization and can lack external contacts with a similar remit and challenges, so the chance to share, reflect and problem-solve with colleagues in this way is a valuable experience. In some settings, APs can even experience a feeling of isolation, so the different opportunities to connect with others on this programme have clearly been valued. The conversations people had experienced seemed to boost confidence, refine thinking, foster creativity and lead to solution-focused next steps.

  1. Creating a space for work

A common challenge for coaches and Advanced Practitioners is finding the time and space for the developmental work they want and need to do with colleagues. Finding a timetable slot when teachers can meet as a group is very difficult in many settings; Finding aligned free periods with the coachee you want to support 1:1 can be impossible; Sourcing a confidential physical space for developmental conversations can prove demanding. APs and coaches are often fighting to develop their role in contexts that do not prioritize non-classroom interactions at any time in the working week. Classroom usage requirements, provision timetabling and other operational forums trump developmental space time and time again, making it very difficult for many AP networks to operate effectively. Supportive and enabling leaders make a significant difference to APs’ access to space and time in their context.

In this environment, a national project such as the Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners helps to create time, space and impetus for development work to happen. Several APs highlighted the fact that this programme has been a catalyst for the development of an initiative that they had in mind but could not previously implement. Others commented on the value of working on a national programme, in terms of the visibility that work has inside the organization and across partnerships. Some APs found that its national programme status had encouraged managers and leaders to engage and support them more actively than on previous initiatives.

APs on the programme were devising developmental projects in their settings leading towards end project reports and dissemination in March 2019 at the national conference. This overarching timeline helped to focus the planning process and fostered some momentum across the year. In a matter of months, AP teams set up a range of initiatives, including Open Door Teaching Week, Triangles of Excellence, action research cycles, Good to Great initiatives, champions in maths and English, video capture for self-reflection and observation, teacher-led learning walks and so on. Many development projects, battered by other operational priorities, under-resourced and fighting for air, can drift, lose focus and never reach a conclusion, let alone an outcome. The structure and status of a national programme can be helpful in tackling those issues.

Even small pots of national project money can make a huge difference to the viability of development work in these times of austerity. The funding for the larger collaborative projects between partner organizations enabled APs to arrange cover, network outside their setting, attend external events and invest in key resources. The benefits and impact of this funding should not be under-estimated and was highly valued by the APs I met.

  1. The benefits of project management

The Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners was planned and implemented using a range of project management approaches. As a qualified project manager, leading the training of the Project Leads on the collaborative partnership projects, I noted the value of these approaches.

The collaborative partnership projects each had a Project Lead who attended two days of face-to-face training on project planning and implementation, with additional support through two webinars at key points in the project process. Mentors supported the Project Leads over the life of their projects using coaching and mentoring approaches. This structured development and support over time encouraged the Leads to focus on:

  • Scoping out the project and identifying desired outcomes
  • Identifying stakeholders for their developmental projects
  • Clarifying roles and responsibilities for APs and others
  • Planning the project timeline
  • Engaging stakeholders and communicating with them
  • Identifying and managing risks
  • Trouble-shooting issues
  • Monitoring progress over time
  • Capturing outcomes and benefits of the projects

The programme of training and webinars enabled the Leads to support each other with planning, trouble-shooting and reflection. Coming together as a full group of Project Leads created rich opportunities for thoughtful dialogue and honest conversations about challenges and glitches. As they were leaving the training, Leads would often highlight the creative and solution-focused energy in the session and how the input on project management and their conversations with colleagues had helped them develop their own thinking about next steps. Their confidence in delivering projects seemed to develop through the life of the programme.

As the trainer/presenter of these sessions, the increase in participants’ confidence and clarity about their projects between day one and two of the training was marked. Projects in the FE sector can often fail in great part due to the lack of focus on planning and implementation skills, so it was an insightful step to include the development of project management skills in this programme.

Next steps with the AP development programme

 At this stage, dissemination in event form was limited to attendance by the current AP group at the national conference in March 2019. Fortunately key learning points from the work to date on the programme will be shared through reports/case studies and I am sure each organization will be sharing their findings through networks as well. At the conference we also heard the exciting news that the Education and Training Foundation will be funding a second phase of the work, involving both experienced and new APs.

The attachment linked here outlines the next phase of the project for 2019 and 2020 and includes application forms to join the various strands. If you have problems downloading this attachment, Joss Kang is the project leader @JossKang on Twitter or via email advancedpractitioners1@gmail.com

Congratulations to all the APs, Project Leads, Mentors and the Project Teams at touchconsulting and CETTAcademy for such an exciting and creative programme. It will be very interesting to see how the current projects evolve next year and how the APs develop further as they embed the work they have started in this phase of the programme.

https://joannemilesconsulting.wordpress.com/2019/04/05/professional-development-programme-for-advanced-practitioners-some-reflections-on-the-national-conference-march-29th-2019/

https://joannemilesconsulting.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/making-the-most-of-the-teaching-and-learning-coach-advanced-practitioner-role-in-your-school-or-college/

 

 

Posted in Advanced Practitioners, Coaching, CPD, CPD for Teachers, Culture for Learning, FE, Professional Development, Project Management, Sharing good practice, Solution Focused Approaches, Staff Development | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners: Some Reflections on the National Conference, March 29th 2019

The National Conference on March 29th2019 was the culmination of a year of rich and varied activity on the Professional Development Programme for Advanced Practitioners, funded by the Education and Training Foundation and delivered by touchconsulting and CETTAcademy. Aiming to develop practitioners working in Advanced Practitioner-type roles across the education and training sector, participants have been able to access five programme strands:

  • Communities of Practice (CoP)
  • Collaborative Projects
  • Developing Advanced Practitioners 3-day CPD programme
  • Advanced Practitioner Toolkit
  • National Advanced Practitioner Conference (March 2019)

More details on these strands on this link:

https://www.et-foundation.co.uk/supporting/support-practitioners/advanced-practitioners/

An Outline of the Conference

The conference was a chance for APs to share, celebrate and critically reflect on the work in different settings this year and to focus on the question “How can APs drive quality improvements in their organizations, departments and teams?”

Conference attendees could attend workshops for an in-depth look at findings from several organizations and also participate in Action Learning Sets and a Thinking Environment Evaluation, for greater breadth and detailed reflection. Having played a small role in the programme, training up the Collaborative Project Leads and some AP Mentors and working in an advisory capacity, I was fascinated to see what had emerged from the work to date in different settings. I work widely in the sector to set up, train and mentor Advanced Practitioner/coaching teams and welcome this national focus on exploring and reflecting on the role in a coherent and structured way. I think AP/coaching teams have much to gain and learn from each other and that the connections and opportunities to collaborate fostered in this ETF programme can lead to significant development in and of the role.

The atmosphere at the National Conference on March 29th2019 was striking and energizing – there was an eagerness to share experiences, an enthusiasm and pride in the work and a strong feeling of connectedness. It felt like a group of people in relationships coming together as a bigger community with plenty of common topics to discuss. There was an openness to reflect on what has been helping the developmental work to go well and where there are challenges and pitfalls to tackle. The narratives were solution-focused, constructive and centred on enhancing practice and skills in future. There was a dominant thread in the narratives about respect for colleagues, about wanting to empower and enable teachers to develop their own practice for themselves and their learners. The APs talked a great deal about being supportive and facilitative and how that translated into their projects in context. I noted plenty of creative, hopeful thinking about what to do next and what they wanted to explore in their settings, to provide even richer opportunities for teachers to reflect and experiment. This was a group of APs who were clearly growing as developmental professionals and aspiring to go further and do better in future. The motivation and dynamism displayed was an inspiring thing to experience.

What has helped Advanced Practitioners to have a positive impact in their context?

From the workshops I attended and the wider conversations during the day, I can say that Advanced Practitioners had identified many approaches and factors that helped them to have positive impact in their role. Recurring themes were:

  • The importance of leaders conceptualizing and promoting the work of coaches/APs as reflective and developmental in nature and not limited to deficit-focused approaches. This meant promoting opportunities for staff to work with APs/coaches on reflection, sharing practice and experimental innovation, so that the role was not restricted to just supporting teachers “requiring improvement.” Advanced Practitioners commented that a leader with a clear, thoughtful and positive vision for the role made a positive impact on how it embedded into the workplace. Advanced Practitioners without that leadership vision and support noted barriers around access to staff, integration of the role into wider improvement work, access to space and time for meetings and CPD.
  • The underpinning ethos of respecting colleagues as professionals and seeking to engage with them about their practice in context, in empowering and enabling ways. Part of this relates to fostering buy-in by engaging colleagues to select areas of focus for their development work and personalizing the support you give as an AP or coach. People spoke about bespoke CPD sessions for clusters of teachers; supporting peer observation triangles; curating bespoke collections of research and resources; facilitating practitioner-led research into a specific area of teaching/learning.
  • Working creatively and flexibly with timetables to find spaces to work with staff – some APs had explored breakfast sessions or lunch time slots or twilight Teach Meets. Others were using technology to curate and collate links, videos and resources for remote access. Some were using digital means for communication via webinar, podcasts and Skype/Zoom.
  • The importance of iterative, collaborative activity within the development work. The APs reinforced the messages emerging from wider CPD studies around the need for repeated, short opportunities to work on developmental areas over time. At Stanmore College, APs noted that having short slots for activity every fortnight fostered commitment to the work and led to good levels of take-up and momentum. The Westminster Kingsway coaches highlighted that teachers had most valued the opportunity of working collaboratively and sharing practice on a TLA area of their choice. They had also greatly valued exploring an action research process within their work over a period of time and its spaces for reflection. These AP experiences re-affirm my belief that one-off CPD is unlikely to generate engagement and developmental change in practice and that as developers, we need to put our attention and focus elsewhere, on more flexible, iterative and personalized models of professional learning.
  • Bishop Burton College and Riseholme College referenced the value of focusing on the positive in TLA development work. Their Open Door Teaching Week encouraged staff to visit other classrooms and look for interesting positive practices. They used Padlet as a repository for comments on the good things people had seen, which the people visited were interested to receive as affirming feedback and food for thought. As they pointed out, the public nature of the comments on the Padlet also generated further discussions between colleagues and teams about practices and resources, creating further dialogue about TLA. This is a very perceptive way of fostering comfort and confidence with a more “open door” culture, I think, and can help to shift the negative association between classroom visits and being judged/assessed, which is often baggage from quality observation cycles.
  • The importance of creating safe experimental space for teachers emerged from many settings. East Riding of Yorkshire Council and City of York Council Adult Learning shared their work on Triangles of Excellence, in which APs worked with teachers to identify an agreed developmental need and then explore new practices through peer observation and experimentation with learners. They talked about the value of going out of your comfort zone, of growing your own skills and practices and how inspiring and re-invigorating this was. Cross service triangles created excitement and interest and the focus on ownership as opposed to accountability was well received and motivational.

Next steps with the AP development programme

 At this stage, dissemination in event form was limited to attendance by the current AP group. While seeing the many positives of the event for reflection and sharing practice, it was unfortunate that funding wasn’t available for a larger sector-facing event at this point in time. There were so many things other AP groups could have taken away as food for thought and exploration. Fortunately, key learning points from the work to date on the programme will be shared through reports/case studies later this year and I am sure each organization will be sharing their findings through networks as well. At the conference we also heard the exciting news that the Education and Training Foundation will be funding a second phase of the work, so watch the website for further details as they emerge. A sector-facing national conference is likely to be part of this work during early 2020 and I think this will be a valuable opportunity for other organizations to tap into this work.

Congratulations to all the APs, Project Leads, Mentors and the Project Teams at touchconsulting and CETTAcademy for such an exciting and creative programme. It will be very interesting to see how the current projects evolve next year and how the APs develop further as they embed the work they have started in this phase of the programme.

https://joannemilesconsulting.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/making-the-most-of-the-teaching-and-learning-coach-advanced-practitioner-role-in-your-school-or-college/

Posted in Action research, Advanced Practitioners, Coaching, CPD, CPD for Teachers, Culture for Learning, FE, Innovation and Creativity in T&L, Leadership of learning, Peer observation, Peer sharing, Peer visits, Personalising learning, Professional Development, Sharing good practice, Staff Development, Teaching and learning | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Interesting reads on differentiation, stretching learners and setting high expectations

 

https://teacherhead.com/2018/09/02/great-teaching-the-power-of-expectations/

https://teacherhead.com/2019/01/24/rescuing-differentiation-from-the-checklist-of-bad-practice/

https://furtheredagogy.wordpress.com/tag/stretch-and-challenge/

https://learningspy.co.uk/assessment/differentiation-to-do-or-not-to-do/

https://chrismoyse.wordpress.com/2014/04/18/a-rough-guide-to-differentiation/

 

 

 

Posted in Assessment methods, CPD for Teachers, Differentiation, Stretch and challenge, Teaching and learning | Tagged , , | Leave a comment